While some think that it’s a small world, it’s actually a BIG, beautifully diverse world out there…and there are endless lessons that our kids can learn from it. Explore the world from wherever you are with Tiny Travelers. Learn about the continents and countries, and what makes them special – from food and festivals, to animals and nature, to language, and culture. These Tiny Travelers activities, fun facts and resources will use the theme of travel to teach kids 8 and under about geography, language, history, culture, and more.

Let’s go, Tiny Travelers, go!

If you have any questions or suggestions,
please reach out to hello@encantos.co.

Lesson 1

Learn About Your World:
Introduction to the Continents

Let’s learn about the seven different continents. Before you begin, you will need yellow, blue, green, orange, red, pink, and white or gray crayons or colored pencils.

Color the Continents in the Following Colors:
Africa Yellow
North America Blue
South America Green
Europe Orange
Asia Red
Australia Pink
Antarctica White

Note to parents

This is a great introductory lesson to teach basic geography skills to preschool and kindergarten learners. Kids will learn the names and locations of each continent with this fun coloring activity.

Lesson 2

Learn About Your World:
Continents Quiz

Now that you’ve learned the names of the continents through your coloring activity, see if you can correctly name them here on this Continents Quiz Map.

Grab a pencil and a printed copy of this Continents Map Quiz and see if you can correctly name each continent by the number on the map.

Be sure to turn over your previous map- no peeking allowed!

Did you get all seven right?

Note to parents

Use the answer sheet to show learners the correct continent names once they have completed the activity.

Lesson 3

Learn About Your World:
Countries of the World

Today, let’s take a look at a political map. Political maps show you the borders of different countries. Before you begin, you will need crayons of all colors and for the second part of the activity you will need an orange, green, blue, purple or pink, and black marker. Grab an atlas as well so you can see the names of the countries!

1) Color your world map.

2) Then, when you are done, draw a star or place a dot with an orange marker on the countries where you have family members living today or where they are from. Ask a family member where your parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins live today or might be from.

3) With a green marker, draw a circle on the countries where you have family friends or friends living today.

4) With a blue marker, make a check or place a dot to countries you have visited.

5) With a purple or pink marker place a heart on the countries you would like to visit someday.

6) With a black marker place a question mark of at least 3 places that you would like to learn more about.

Note to parents

Help your kids think about family and friends, where they live and where they are from. Remind them of the places they have visited and ask them where they would love to travel to someday. Ask them what they are curious about. Then, help develop inquiry by asking them what places they would like to learn more about and why? What questions do they come up with?

Lesson 4

Learn About Your World:
Animals of the World

Let’s get to know where some of our favorite animals live in the world! Before you begin, you will need markers or crayons, scissors, and glue.

1) Color the map and its animal shapes.

2) On the sheet with the animal illustrations, color the animal illustrations and cut them out.

3) Match the animal cut out to the correct animal shape on the map to see where these animals live in the world.

4) When you’ve matched the shape, glue the animal to its home!

Why do you think some animals live in only some parts of the world?What are some animals that live near water or in the water?

Note to parents

Use this as a jumping-off point to discuss differences in weather or terrain. You could also talk about how animals need to live in certain climates to survive and live happy lives.

Lesson 5

Learn About Your World:
Oceans of the World

Now, that you have learned about the different continents and the countries within them, let’s learn about the oceans of the world. There are seven continents and five oceans on the planet. Before you get started, you will need five different colored crayons or colored pencils in various shades of blue and green as outlined in the instructions.

Color each ocean as follows:

Pacific Ocean: Teal or Turquoise

Atlantic Ocean: Dark Blue

Indian Ocean: Blue

Arctic Ocean: Light Blue

Southern Ocean: Light Green

Then, cut out some of the ocean animals provided (sheet 3) and add them to your map! You will need a glue stick and scissors for this part.

Note to parents

Some children will benefit from reading aloud the directions and making sure they know what each ocean is and how to color it accordingly. Of course, there can be slight variations on the colors if you do not have one of the shades of green or blue. The main idea is that children understand even though it looks like one big body of water, there are names to different oceans around the world.

Lesson 6

Learn About Your World:
Land and Water Forms

Let’s play a fun matching game to learn about the different land and water forms that exist in the world!

Before you begin, you will need blue and brown colored pencils or crayons, a pair of scissors, a glue stick, and all printed activity sheets.

First, using the example page provided, review how the land and water forms should be paired together.

Next, let’s create our matching game!

Color the gray area with blue to represent water

Color in the white spaces with brown to represent land

Cut out each land and water form picture

Cut out each definition and paste it on the back of its matching land or water form

When you are done, see if you can play a matching game with each landform and its opposite water form with yourself, a grown-up, or sibling! (hint: the opposites are paired on the same page before you cut them out)

Note to parents

You can use this activity as a jumping-off point to discuss different types of land and water forms. As an extension activity to this lesson, see if you can find some examples of islands, lakes, and other forms introduced in an internet image search. See if you can look at where some of these land and water forms might be in your own neighborhood, region, or state. Print out these pictures and place them beside each land and water form from the print out to see real-life examples.

Lesson 7

Let’s create a compass rose to learn about the cardinal directions, north, south, east, and west!

What is a compass rose? A compass rose is a drawing that is usually found on maps to show the cardinal directions, north, south, east, and west. Have you ever looked at a map and said, “the United States of America is above Mexico?” But if you are in Mexico and looked up you wouldn’t see the United States. Instead, it is better for us to say that the United States of America is north of Mexico. The most northern point on our planet is the North Pole and the most southern point is the South Pole. When facing north, east would be left in relation to where you are standing and when facing north, west would be to the left. Before you create your own compass rose style, check out the examples below for some inspiration:

Note to parents

See if you can play a game with your child saying what countries are east and west, and north and south of each other using a political map and a compass rose.. For example: “I spy with my little eye a country that is south of the United States of America.” See if they can find Mexico or any country that is south of the United States of America. You can also use hints using family members or friends that are from or live in different parts of the world; for example, “I spy a country that your grandfather is from that is east of Brazil.”

Lesson 8

Let’s create a map of your home, Tiny Travelers!

Before you begin you will need crayons or colored pencils, scissors, and a glue stick.

We’ll use pictures and symbols to tell a story about the people who live there and create a fun treasure hunt that you can play with other family members.

1) Start with drawing a map of your home. Check out the map examples for some inspiration!

2) Next, draw or cut out pictures and symbols to tell a story about the people who live in your home.

3) Then, add some of the “special symbols” to make your home map into a treasure map!

4) Add a map key with symbols, lines, special shapes, and colors to help readers make sense of the map.

5) You can also use some of the treasure chests or x’s provided to mark the placement of your first treasure.

6) You can make this into a game and hide objects for a treasure hunt game with family members.

Note to parents

Be sure to help children identify important places and symbols that can tell the story of who lives there. Consider adding a pet or a special reading nook. Remind children to add a map key to help map readers understand symbols that will give them clues in reading the map and finding the treasure.

Lesson 9

Let’s explore the countries and animals of North America, Tiny Travelers!

Before you begin you will need crayons or colored pencils and a pencil.

First, explore the continents of North America. Take a look at the fourteen countries. See what countries you already know about and look for the names of new countries that you might just be learning about for the first time. Find their locations and when you feel ready, quiz yourself using the North America continents quiz.

When you are ready to move onto the next activity, take a look at the animals of North America map and give them some color to bring them to life!

Note to parents

Be sure to help children identify the locations of countries by pointing at the countries and calling out their names aloud. You can also pull out any atlases at home and check out other maps of North America online. Ask your child if there are any countries that they are just learning about and see if they can locate it on the map.

Lesson 10

Rain or shine, Kiki, Ricky and Nicky enjoy all kinds of weather while celebrating one of Mexico’s most famous songs.

Learn About Mexico: Land and Water Forms; Intro to Spanish

Bienvenido a Mexico, Tiny Travelers! Did you know, Mexico is located in the continent of North America? In Mexico, they speak Spanish so let’s get to know some Spanish words with a fun video from Canticos! In “Weather the Weather” or “Jaraba Tapatío,” our learners will learn about all kinds of weather through one of Mexico’s most famous songs. Check it out now!

In today’s lesson, we will bring together some of the things you learned about maps, geography, and land and water forms as we explore Mexico. In Mexico, there are many high mountains throughout the country, vast deserts in the north, and lush green rain forests in the south and in the east.

Before you get started, you will need crayons and a pencil.

First, color the physical map of Mexico.

Next, find and circle the following water forms on the map:
1) the Gulf of Mexico
2) the Gulf of California
3) the Pacific Ocean

See if you can also find and circle the following landforms:
1) The Mexican Plateau
2) the Sonoran Desert and the Chihuahuan Desert
3) Sierra Madre Occidental, Sierra Madre Oriental, Sierra Madre del Sur, Sierra Nevada Mountain ranges
4) the Yucatan Peninsula

Note to parents

There are a lot of Mexico specific land and water forms to explore in this map.

Lesson 11

Learn about Mexico: Draw an Axolotl

In Mexico, one of the most studied salamanders in the world are known as Axolotls. Wild axolotls live in swampy areas of Lake Xochimilco and in the canals that flow into the southern edge of Mexico City.

Axolotls have also been known to have once lived in Lake Chalco, one of Mexico City’s five “great lakes”. This is one of the areas that the Aztecs settled. The Aztec called themselves Culhua-Mexica and they were a Nahuatl-speaking people who ruled a large empire in what we now call central and southern Mexico. The Axolotl name comes from the Nahuatl language and is pronounced Ax-oh-lot-ul. Atl means “water” and xolotl means “dog,” after the Xolotl, the canine Aztec deity.

In today’s lesson, we will learn how to draw your own Axolotl!

Before you begin, you will need a pencil, eraser, and colored pencils or crayons.

1) Did you know: Even though the Axolotl is commonly known as a “Mexican Walking Fish” it is not a fish at all. Axolotls are salamanders which is also a kind of amphibian. They are more like a cousin to a frog than they are to a fish.

2) Axolotls are carnivores known to eat worms, insect larvae, tiny shell fish known as crustaceans, and some fish.

3) Axolotls can live up to 10-15 years but are now considered to be a critically endangered species.

4) Did you know: Axolotls are neotenic salamanders, which means even as they grows older, Axolotls still look as if they are young.

5) Axolotls can regenerate (which is a fancy word to re-grow) the same limb up to 5 times!!

Note to parents

Here are some fun facts about Axolotls to share with your little learners during this activity.

Lesson 12

Learn About Mexico: Lucha Libre

Did you know that Mexican wrestling as we know it today, found its popularity as a sport in the early 1900s? The origins of the freestyle wrestling form, lucha libre, which literally translates to “free fight” go all the way back to 1863. That’s over 150 years of a Mexican wrestling tradition!

Today’s activity is to create your own lucha libre mask and to color a lucha libre wrestling scene. Before you begin, grab some crayons or colored pencils and a pair of scissors to cut out your mask when you are done.

Lesson 13

Learn About Mexico:
Mexican Hot Chocolate

Did you know that chocolate originates from Mexico? The Olmecs of southern Mexico were probably some of the first people to grind cacao beans to make a chocolate drink for rituals and medicine almost 4,000 years ago! The Aztec and Mayan people also used chocolate. Mayans have an earth goddess and goddess of the cacao tree that they called Ixcacao pronounced like eesh-cah-cow. Can you say that? IX means ‘her’ while cacao of course means ‘chocolate.’ Ixcacao was often called into prayer along with the corn mother and the rain god.

In today’s lesson, get to know the different foods of Mexico with a fun coloring sheet! Then, learn how to make Mexican hot chocolate with a grown-up using our favorite recipe. Did you know that in Mexico people sometimes use this wooden whisk called a Molinillo that makes the chocolate foamy? Also, in some parts of Mexico, hot chocolate is made with water and not milk, which makes each drink taste different. Lastly, people in Mexico don’t use a lot of sugar so that you can taste a bit of the spice from the chocolate itself.

Note to parents

Note to Grown Ups: This recipe should be done with adult supervision as it involves heating milk and chocolate on a stove top.

Lesson 14

Learn About Puerto Rico:
Land and Water Forms

In today’s lesson, we will continue to apply your learning about maps, geography, and land and water forms as we explore Puerto Rico. One very important landform in Puerto Rico is the mountain range known as Cordillera Central. These incredibly lush mountains in the center of Puerto Rico run the length of the country from east to west. Bananas, pineapples, and plantains are grown throughout the region as well as coffee. The beaches and coastlines of Puerto Rico are also some of the most beautiful in the world! The important water forms include the Atlantic Ocean in the north, the Caribbean Sea in the south, and the Vieques Sound between mainland Puerto Rico and the island of Vieques in the east. A sound is a waterform that is located along a coastline and it is a narrow sea or ocean channel between two bodies of land.

Today, you will color a map of Puerto Rico. Once you’re done, follow the guide to create a 3D salt dough map of Puerto Rico as well!

Before you get started, you will need crayons or colored pencils to color the map.

First, color the physical map of Puerto Rico. Find and circle the following water forms on the map:

1) The Atlantic Ocean
2) The Caribbean Sea
3) The Vieques Sound

Then, find and circle the following landforms:
1) Cordillera Central Mountains
2) Vieques Island
3) Culebra Island

Lesson 15

The Sound of the Coqui Frog

Learn About Puerto Rico:
Draw a Coquí Frog

In Puerto Rico, we find a special kind of frog called the coquí, pronounced ko-kee. Coquís are named for the loud sound the male frogs make at night. Coquís are nocturnal, which means they are most active at night. During the day, they rest in the shade under logs and rocks. Coquís are carnivores, which is a fancy word for meat-eater. They like to eat other small critters like ants, crickets, moths, spiders, snails, smaller frogs, and even lizards!!

In today’s lesson, you will learn how to draw your own coquí! Before you begin, you will need a pencil, eraser, and colored pencils or crayons.

Coquís are one of the largest frog species found in Puerto Rico!

Coquís are a beloved symbol of Puerto Rico and the Taíno culture. Legends tell of a time when the island was inhabited by millions of coquís way before humans came to the island of Puerto Rico.

Many frog types have webbed feet but not coquís! Their scientific name (Eleutherodactylus) literally translates to “free toes.”

Coquís grow to be about one to two inches long. That’s the size of two quarters side by side. So tiny but so loud when they all sing at night in the jungles of El Yunque rainforest! Check out the clip to hear the sound the male coquís make at night!

Note to parents

Here are some fun facts about coquís to share with your little learners during this activity:

Lesson 16

Learn About Puerto Rico:
Music of Puerto Rico

Let’s dance, Tiny Travelers! Today we will explore the rich history of Puerto Rico’s Bomba and Plena music. Drawing inspiration from traditional African music, what’s fun about Bomba and Plena is that they are both interactive! In Bomba music, singers lead a call-and-response chorus along to the beat that the musicians make with their barrel drums known as the subidor or primo (bomba barrel or drum). The musicians also play other percussion instruments including maracas, and the cuá or fuá, two sticks that are played against a piece of wood or the barrel of the bomba drum. While Plena music has one rhythm, Bomba can have up to 16 different rhythms! Plena music tells more of a story, usually about events or times when people needed to join together to make change.

Puerto Rico has a long history of using music as a form of storytelling. In both Bomba and Plena, you can hear songs about resistance, struggle, celebration, and joy! No matter the style, it is music that brings together the soul of the Puerto Rican people and their cultural pride for their beloved island!

Today, you can bring to life a scene of Bomba musicians and dancers with a fun coloring activity. While you color, enjoy the sound of Bomba with this song: Mayelá (bomba) by Viento De Agua. To see a video of Bomba musicians, singers, and dancers, take a look here!

Before you begin, you will need a pencil, eraser, and colored pencils or crayons.

Note to parents

You can listen to more music from Puerto Rico on the Tiny Travelers Spotify playlist here !

Lesson 17

Learn About Puerto Rico:
Make a Vejigante Mask

The vejigante, pronounced ve-hee-GAN-teh is a character that represents an enemy or monster and can be seen in Puerto Rico during festivals such as Carnaval, Fiestas de Santiago Apóstol (in honor of St. James ), and other days of celebrations. The vejigante mask is known as the careta and it is usually made using papier-mâché or coconut husks and sometimes gourds. The legend of the vejigante comes from the Spanish settlers that brought over this symbol from Spain.

The Loíza vejigante masks are some of the most recognizable examples in Puerto Rican folk art. This style became popular by the late Don Castor Ayala over 60 years ago! Today, the Ayala family still makes these masks out of coconut and bamboo from their home in Loíza, in the northeast coast of Puerto Rico!

In today’s lesson, you can color your own vejigante mask also known as a careta.

Even though the masks represent a villian type of character, they are still used in playful ways and shown in bright colors throughout celebrations. Can you bring your vejigante to life using bright, fun, and playful colors?

Lesson 18

Learn About Puerto Rico:
Foods of Puerto Rico

Let’s get cooking, Tiny Travelers! From pasteles to arroz con gandules, chicharrón to bacalaíto, Puerto Ricans love their food and take great pride in cooking from the heart. For today’s activity, we are going to focus on one of the most beloved sweets in Puerto Rico: an icy type of ice cream called limber.

Limbers can be found all over Puerto Rico; at roadside fruit stands, local colmados (convenience stores), and even gas stations! Limbers are commonly made with tropical juices and sometimes with milk! They are the perfect treat to cool down on a warm day, or when you want a light snack to satisfy your sweet tooth.

If you’re wondering about its unique name, limbers are actually named after Charles A. Lindbergh, the first pilot to fly across the Atlantic Ocean. When Lindbergh flew alone to Puerto Rico on his 26th birthday, on February 4, 1928, he was offered a frozen fruit juice. He enjoyed it so much that the locals then started freezing the juice and calling it “limber” in his honor!

Today’s activity includes a fun Puerto Rico coloring sheet in which you can explore what foods you would traditionally find on the table at home. Once you’ve completed your coloring sheet, try making a limber with our recipe! This easy-to-follow recipe can be customized in a variety of ways to adapt to ingredients you have in your home.The flavor options are endless – you can use any fruit that you have available and it’s a kid-approved healthy alternative to a traditional popsicle!

Note to parents

This recipe should be done with adult supervision.

Lesson 19

Learn About the Caribbean:
Geography and Animals

In today’s lesson, we will continue to apply your learning about maps, geography, and land and water forms as we explore the Caribbean Islands. In lesson 6, we learned about some land and water forms that include a landform called an archipelago. An archipelago is a group of islands that are close together. That is why the islands in the Caribbean are called the Caribbean Archipelago. Did you know that there are over 7,000 islands in the Caribbean archipelago? There are 13 countries in the Caribbean and 12 territories! A territory is an extension of other countries. In the Caribbean, there are three main ecosystems such as forests, coastal areas, and wetlands full of wildlife, from birds, to reptiles, and sea creatures!

Today, you will color a map of the Caribbean islands and find some land and water forms in the region. Then, you can color some of our favorite animals of the Caribbean! Before you get started, you will need crayons or colored pencils to color the map.

First, color the physical map of the Caribbean. Find and circle the following water forms on the map:

Landforms

  • Lucayan Archipelago

  • Greater Antilles

  • Lesser Antilles

Water Forms 

  • Straits of Florida

  • Gulf of Mexico

  • Atlantic Ocean

  • Caribbean Sea

© Copyright - Tiny Travelers - © 2020 Encantos Media Studios, PBC. All Rights Reserved. Our apps are COPPA compliant. | Terms & Conditions |